‘Interview With The Vampire’ Season 2 Episode 4 Recap & Ending Explained: What Is Armand’s Origin?

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I don’t know how skilled Daniel is at reading between the lines. But the devil is not in the details of the story he’s hearing (and reading) in Louis de Pointe du Lac’s luxurious penthouse in season 2 of Interview with the Vampire. It’s always in what’s left unsaid. It’s in the lines that are crossed, triggering Armand to invade Daniel’s mind and memories. It’s also in all the carefully crafted plotholes meant to rile up Louis. But why? What’s the point of this whole thing? Even though I believe we’ll find the answers in due time, way before Daniel does, we’ll still need to sit quietly and listen, like we’re supposed to. 

Spoiler Alert


How’s Claudia handling being the star of Sam’s play?

Dread was the first thing to show up on Claudia’s face when she was handed the little girl’s frock at the end of episode 3. But I don’t think playing the little birdie in My Baby Loves Windows was awful right off the bat. It was awkward, sure. But it also came with the kind of applause that Théâtre des Vampires hadn’t been garnering in post-war Paris. Baby Lu’s fall from the window captured the Parisian people clinging to kitsch entertainment to forget the damage done by the Nazis. This is a pretty fitting statement against Louis’ snobbish rejection of anything that isn’t avant-garde. The maitre’s notes for Claudia might make Daniel chuckle now, but Claudia was practically fading away each time she was forced to go on stage and sing that terrible song that she hated way more than Santiago did. And knowingly butchering it on the 500th show of My Baby Loves Windows only got her a good ol’ thrashing from the maitre. She was bound to the character that she loathed and compelled to wear Baby Lu’s ugly frock until she learned how to be grateful. It’s not that Armand’s unfair reprimand wasn’t questioned. Santiago and the rest of the coven have had enough of their leader’s bias toward the handsome American vampire he’s fallen for. And they demand the same commitment from Armand that he’s demanding from Claudia. I do think Santiago’s gone a little soft on Claudia. Maybe it’s her great law-breaking documentation of the dark secrets of vampirism that he finds audacious. But it could also be the unabashed honesty in her diary, even if Santiago’s been crucified in it, that truly speaks to this righteous vampire. 


What is the origin of Armand?

It was rather awkward for Armand to have Louis say no when Santiago was inquiring about their relationship status. I guess even an ancient vampire like him wasn’t protected against falling for someone who wasn’t ready to commit. But Louis had a lot on his plate. His mind wouldn’t stop projecting Lestat. All the rage that empowered his pyrokinesis was tied to the ex-boyfriend he’d murdered. His inability to click pictures in daylight made his work mediocre at best. And Santiago’d just called him out for being a pretentious liar. Armand didn’t help his case by repeating the same abusive, hot-and-cold pattern that Louis associated with Lestat. And even though it took a lot of courage for Armand to take Louis to the Louvre and open up about the trauma of his origin, I hope Louis recognized how that could’ve also been a manipulative move. Lestat did the same thing with his sad tale of Magnus in season 2. Nonetheless, I have to admit that Armand’s story was a tearjerker. He pointed straight at the 20-something man in Palma Vecchio’s “Adoration of the Shepherds with a Donor,” called him Amadeo, and claimed that it was him in the 15th century. Apparently, Armand was once an Indian kid named Arun, sold into a life of slavery and prostitution by his parents. He was then picked up and turned by Marius de Romanus, someone who had feigned his love just like Lestat. It was only when the Roman coven intervened and killed his maker that Armand actually came to be. 


What’s eating Claudia?

Your heart kind of breaks for this vampire perpetually stuck in the mayhem that is teenage. Louis is off with Armand. She’s treated like a child in the coven and on the stage. And she’s still not found a friend she can open up to. So you can’t really blame Claudia for taking a chance on Madeleine, the Nazi-sympathizer dressmaker. I guess she knows better than to judge a person based on surface-level anecdotes. So when she gets to know that the swastika on Madeleine’s window is not for Hitler but for a jittery German soldier she’d come to love, her hunch is proven right. But as long as Armand’s being pushed to tighten his grip on the group, he’s going to continue projecting his trepidations onto all the wrong people. And this time, it’s Claudia, reprimanded for befriending a mortal and not doing her part of the wet work. You have to realize what a significant betrayal it feels like to Claudia when she gets to know that Armand’s known about her hand in Lestat’s death all along. It was supposed to be her and Louis. She came to Paris believing Louis was finally choosing her over his insecure need for love. But Louis has once again rejected Claudia over another man. And that too over the man who’s getting pretty abusive with her. 


What’s Armand hiding from Daniel?

There are a number of ways Louis and Armand are oddly similar. For starters, they’re both lonely, terrified, and clinging to each other. But what actually gets in the way of them ever being on the same page is their tendency to change their minds about what kind of dynamic they’re looking for. And considering unflinching honesty is the only thing that can solve it, it’s no surprise that Armand’s vulnerability softens Louis. That whole business at the museum was Armand’s way of saying that he’s tired of leading. And Louis heard him loud and clear. Armand’s right to be wary of the rebellion forming within his own coven. Santiago and most of the coven members are tired of watching their maitre cut his boyfriend a lot of unfair slack. And they’re out plotting, snooping, and spying. 

It’s come to Louis that he can’t keep letting Lestat tag along. However much he may still love him, Armand is the promise of a new beginning. This actualization is the only thing that can help him move on. I can’t help but notice how he’s repeating the same patterns in his relationship with Armand. I think a part of Louis is actually thrilled that Armand’s losing control of his coven. That opens up a leadership spot that Louis can fill. The weaker of the two is no more. What more could Louis want from her very anti-Lestat relationship? But I doubt that his plan of Armand fooling Santiago with a pretend promotion will work. They’re expecting Santiago to fail as the new maitre and drown in his own hubris. But ironically, it’s Louis’ own overconfidence that’s making him blind to the very consequential threat that the Covel rebellion is growing into. 

For a while there, it looked like Armand was being a protective boyfriend and attacking Daniel with his own memories every time Daniel hurt Louis’ feelings. But what happens in the 4th episode as Louis’ artistic insecurities as a failed photographer come to the surface kind of makes me entertain another theory. What if the visions of Armand reading Daniel’s most shameful memories to him are flashbacks from San Francisco? 

In the ending sequence of episode 4 of Interview with the Vampire, Daniel slips up by revealing a hush-hush piece of information he got from Raglan James. He wasn’t supposed to know that the Théâtre des Vampires had been turned to ashes. It was probably Armand’s very dysfunctional rule that had resulted in that fate, but I don’t think Armand’s punishing Daniel for implying that. It’s possible that Daniel’s memories are resurfacing. Time and again, Interview with the Vampire has implied that the first interview all those years ago ended with Louis attacking Daniel. Daniel’s visions in the present timeline go back to a corpse wrapped in plastic, likely Louis’ food from when he was first interviewed. And then there’s this vision of Armand reminding Daniel of the time he’d asked a girl to cover her head so that he could get intimate with her. That not only implies that Daniel’s possibly a closeted homosexual who’s buried his truth so deeply he’s forgotten it, but also that Armand was using that information to disorient him. What was he trying to get him to forget? Only the fact that Louis attacked him? There’s bound to be more to it than that. It’s also not totally impossible that Armand planted false memories in Daniel’s head in San Francisco. And if you ask me, I think he’s guilty of slipping a few pictures taken by renowned photographers into Louis’ album. He’s trying to get Louis to react to something. And I can’t wait to find out what his endgame is. 


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Lopamudra Mukherjee
Lopamudra Mukherjee
In cinema, Lopamudra finds answers to some fundamental questions of life. And since jotting things down always makes overthinking more fun, writing is her way to give this madness a meaning.

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