Selma In ‘Furies’ Series, Explained: Did She Kill Driss?

Published

In the thriller genre, the debate is always about moral good vs. bad. Especially in the action genre, there may be gray characters; however, they’re either the anti-hero or the anti-villain. Rarely is there an in-between. Netflix’s new French-language show has left me massively confused in this regard. Selma is a character who is meant to be the beacon of the show. Every other character is the little moth that flies towards the light. However, this little spotlight’s got many little dark secrets up her sleeve. As I mentioned in my review of the show, it seems like most of the big plot twists are revealed in the aftermath of something unimaginable having already occurred. A person is killed. Okay, why was he killed? This is the order in which we’re meant to ask the questions as a viewer; however, I don’t think it makes sense for the story to also be written in this order. It makes everything feel volatile and somewhat unfaithful to the plot. This is my big qualm with the show. As much as there is action and it’s a female-led action series, there’s no sense to most of the big reveals and twists. And on the other side, the ones that do make sense are quite predictable, so it feels almost pointless to actually watch the whole thing. I suppose there is a payoff by the end of the series because the two lead characters are alive and well and are set up for a new adventure, and all the plot holes from the season are covered, even if they don’t entirely make sense. 

While Lyna is the protagonist of the show, it’s actually Selma who propels it forward. She calls the shots, both literally and figuratively. At first, you feel like she’s one of those characters who is misunderstood at the beginning, but in truth, she’s squeaky clean, and everything she does is for the right reasons. However, as the show progresses, her role seems to confuse me further. Does she actually care for Lyna? Does she care for anybody? Maybe she’s actually after power. One thing is very clear: Selma will go to any length to prove her worth as the Fury. However, she also believes the Furies are more powerful than they’re set out to be. More than maintaining the peace between the godfathers, it seems as if Selma may be more interested in controlling them. Selma is the latest descendant of this matrilineal succession. She’s got no heir, and so she is willing to go to any length to bring Lyna into the business, never bothering to know if Lyna actually wants anything to do with this job (ugh, what a terrible aunt). 

I suppose, for the most part, most of Selma’s decisions almost seem plain stupid and very personal. Oh, my brother’s wife is an undercover cop; let me massacre her whole family and pin it on him. Wait what? My niece has nowhere to go; let me give her up to a nice family that works for Olympus, only to steal her when she’s of age to become my heir instead of asking her what she wants in life. Somehow, even in this situation, she has very loyal subjects who follow her every move without question. Whatever she asks of them, they blindly do. Yet, somehow, she’s still left without control of Olympus because the one thing she’s supposed to protect, the Bible of the Six, goes missing and everything gets messy. Selma is meant to be this strong, indestructible character. So much so that she doesn’t even die, Driss only pretends she’s dead to wreak havoc in Olympus, so Praques can infiltrate and take up her role (so easily) as the new Fury in order to get Driss exactly what he wants. How can six Godfathers be so unintelligent? It simply doesn’t make sense to me! 

Selma is willing to do anything to make sure the fury remains in the Aragos family name. She even kills one of the Olympus members as a traitor, despite promising him that she would look the other way and protect him. Selma isn’t just a violent psychopathic killer; she’s also a massive liar and manipulator. She lies to Lyna, she lies to her subordinates, she lies to Driss and Olympus, and I’m not quite sure at this point what’s likeable about her.

Ironically, Driss’s whole revenge plot began because Selma stole everything from him. His family, his daughter, even his name. However, somehow, at the end of the show, despite everything they’ve been through, Driss decides to give Selma the benefit of the doubt. We know by this time that Selma was the one who killed Kahina’s (Lyna’s mother) family (more like butchered) because it was her fault that an undercover cop got so close to Olympus, that too, riding on the back of her little brother. Obviously, Driss would want to fight against her after she ruined his whole life when he was already living as a nobody, being a male child in the Fury family. However, at the end of the show, when Driss is on the brink of death, he asks Selma to end his life, taking the secret about Selma killing Kahina’s family with him. Why would he do this when the whole thing started because of that? I’m not quite sure, really. Ultimately, Driss doesn’t want his daughter to live with the guilt of killing her own father, but he’s okay with her not knowing the truth about her aunt. Somehow, Selma wins again, and Lyna’s ultimately chooses her side because she’s left all alone. At the end of the show, because Olympus put the gun in their own mouths, Damocles took up the reins and became the new Olympus. So, instead of freedom, Selma and Lyna have another life-threatening situation on their hands. 

I suppose, at the end of the day, Selma is quite an insufferable character. She’s got no backbone to accept her mistakes, and she uses lies and deceit to manipulate people into believing she’s indestructible when in reality she’s stepping on everybody in her way to stay standing. 


Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Ruchika Bhat
Ruchika Bhat
When not tending to her fashion small business, Ruchika or Ru spends the rest of her time enjoying some cinema and TV all by herself. She's got a penchant for all things Korean and lives in drama world for the most part.

Must Read

DMT Guide

More Like This